Yale Law School student bucks outrage crowd who accused him of racism over party invitation

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Trent Colbert, second-year student at Yale Law School, is refusing to apologize after his fellow students lodged allegations of racism at him over a party invitation.

What is the background?

On Sept. 15, Colbert — who is part Cherokee — sent an email to the Native American Law Students Association inviting the group to a party. The invitation email said:

Hope you’re all still feeling social! This Friday at 7:30, we will be christening our very own (soon to be) world-renowned NALSA Trap House [redacted] by throwing a Constitution Day Bash in collaboration with FedSoc. Planned attractions include Popeye’s chicken, basic-bitch-American-themed snacks (like apple pie, etc.), a cocktail station, assorted hard and soft beverages, and (most importantly) the opportunity to attend the NALSA Trap House’s inaugural mixer!

Hope to see you all there!

According to the Washington Free Beacon, a screenshot of the email was immediately shared in an online forum for second-year law students. Some of Colbert’s classmates claimed the invitation was racist. In fact, the president of the Black Law Students Association allegedly said, “I guess celebrating whiteness wasn’t enough. … Y’all had to upgrade to cosplay/black face.”

The next day — after nine discrimination and harassment complaints were lodged — Colbert was summoned to meet with two school administrators: associate dean Ellen Cosgrove and diversity director Yaseen Eldik. Colbert recorded the meeting.

Eldik — who worked in the Obama administration, the Free Beacon noted — told Colbert the references in the invitation to “trap house” and fried chicken were “triggering associations.” He was also told his membership in the Federalist Society was problematic.

After the meeting, Cosgrove and Eldik allegedly threatened to undermine Colbert’s reputation and hurt his chances of passing the bar exam if he did not apologize. The administrators even drafted an apology letter on behalf of Colbert, but he declined to send it. When Colbert refused, the administrators sent a note to all second-year law students condemning the “pejorative and racist language.”

“We condemn this in the strongest possible terms,” the note read.

What did Colbert say?

Responding to the controversy in an essay published Monday, Colbert explained that he is not against apologizing, but refused to do so in this situation — and has maintained his position — because he felt the situation did not warrant an apology.

“Not every instance where an apology is demanded is one where it is actually warranted,” he wrote.

“After all, a fellow student wrote in our class forum that my failure to apologize was ‘corny.’ If I had interpreted the usage of ‘corny’ to be a sly reference to my indigenous background (corn is a Native American crop with immense cultural significance in indigenous communities), should that student be forced to apologize to me? I believe most people, including that student, would say no,” Colbert continued.

“An action does not warrant a forced apology just because an individual or a group demands it,” he wrote. “Instead, an apology should be a sincere expression of remorse and admission of fault.”

What did Yale say?

The school responded to the controversy this month by claiming Yale Law School honors free speech.

“At no time was any disciplinary investigation launched or disciplinary action taken in this matter,” the statement read, in part. “While any person may report concerns about a lawyers’ character and fitness to the bar, the law school has a longstanding policy of reporting only formal disciplinary action to the Bar Association.”

Fox News catches McAuliffe campaign buying ‘fake news’ ads to take down Youngkin

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An investigation has found that former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) has spent nearly $100,000 promoting “fake news” websites on Facebook that give favorable coverage to his Virginia gubernatorial campaign against Republican Glenn Youngkin.

McAuliffe’s campaign has purchased Facebook ads that link to third-party websites that are designed to look like local news sources but instead publish disinformation and “partisan propaganda,” Fox News reported. The ads have been viewed up to 3.5 million times so far in a tight election, with McAuliffe and Youngkin tied in the polls just one week from Election Day.

Fox News describes the McAuliffe campaign’s fake news ads as “sophisticated and opaque.”

The campaign operates a Facebook page called “The Download Virginia,” which was launched in June. The page’s name sounds like the name of a news outlet, but according to Fox News it has not published any posts or photos and only 104 people are following it at the time this article was published.

By looking through Facebook’s Ad Library Report, a tool for journalists and researchers, Fox News discovered that the McAuliffe campaign has spent $471,044 on ads distributed by this page since June.

“The advertisements generally contain a comment and a link to a mainstream news article that covers the campaign favorably. But sprinkled among the links to legitimate media are seven separate advertisements (and dozens of variations) that promote websites widely considered to be ‘fake news,'” Fox News reports.

A July advertisement, for example, featured a favorable comment about McAuliffe’s views on small businesses and then linked to an article published by a third party website called the Virginia Dogwood.

The Dogwood is designed to look like a local news website and it claims to publish “credible, fact-based reporting.” But the website discloses it is owned and operated by Courier Newsroom, a group that was founded by the progressive dark money group ACRONYM and funded by multibillionaire Democratic donor George Soros, LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman, and several Hollywood movie producers. Courier Newsroom has since been purchased by former Democratic strategist Tara McGowan’s group Good Information Inc., a public benefit corporation that says it aims to fight “disinformation” by investing in local news companies, which is financially supported by many of the same progressive donors.

A Washington Post editorial from February 2020, written by a correspondent for a fact-checking organization, said that Courier Newsroom creates “hyperlocal partisan propaganda” through websites like the Dogwood.

Another advertisement from the Download in October claimed that Youngkin has a “very concerning” policy on vaccination and linked to an article published by the American Independent.

The Independent describes itself as a platform for “progressive news” and admits it is funded by the American Bridge 21st Century Foundation. The foundation is a liberal dark money group founded by David Brock, “a wealthy and influential Democratic donor who is also a close ally of the Clinton family,” Fox News reported. In 2020, Brock’s group spent $59.7 million to oppose Republican candidates, according to OpenSecrets.

Both the Dogwood and the Independent are labeled “fake news” websites by OpenSecrets. And Fox News reported that the McAuliffe campaign has reached millions of Facebook users through ads promoting disinformation from those websites:

The McAuliffe campaign has spent a total of between $90,200 to $106,398 on advertisements linking to the Independent and the Dogwood. Those advertisements have garnered the campaign a total of between 3,290,000 and 3,470,000 “impressions,” a term that Facebook uses to describe the number of screens that an advertisement has reached.

Each ad contains a disclaimer that it was paid for by “Terry for Virginia” and authorized by the candidate himself (Facebook requires candidates to add disclaimers like these to all political ads). But none of the advertisements disclose that the websites are considered to be “fake news” or that their information may be misleading.

The Democratic National Committee, which has publicly condemned misinformation on social media platforms, did not respond to Fox News’ requests for comment on the McAuliffe campaign’s fake news ads.

The McAuliffe campaign also did not respond to Fox News’ requests for comment, but the network reports that two advertisements that linked to the American Independent as recently as last week were disabled after Fox News made inquiries.

A spokesperson for the Youngkin campaign said “disinformation practices are standard for McAuliffe, whose lies go into overdrive when he’s desperate.”

The spokesperson added that “not a single left-wing propaganda arm disguised as a news organization will turn the tide” of this close election.

Another In-N-Out Burger in northern California gets shut down for failing to check customers for proof of COVID vaccinations

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Northern California officials have shut down a second In-N-Out Burger location for failing to check customers for proof of COVID-19 vaccinations or negative coronavirus test results, the Los Angeles Times reported.

What are the details?

The first In-N-Out shutdown occurred earlier this month at a restaurant in San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf for the same reason. The Times said that location has since reopened for outdoor dining only.

But on Tuesday, Contra Costa Health Services said the the In-N-Out at 570 Contra Costa Blvd. in Pleasant Hill was shut down after repeatedly violating county rules, the Times reported.

More from the paper:

Officials in Contra Costa County, located east of San Francisco and Oakland, said they gave the In-N-Out in Pleasant Hill ample opportunities to comply, but it created a public health hazard by “repeatedly violating” the county order. That order, in effect since Sept. 22, requires restaurants and some other indoor establishments to verify that all customers 12 or older are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or have had a negative coronavirus test within the previous 72 hours.

Officials said the Pleasant Hill In-N-Out garnered four citations over several weeks and had to pay fines totaling $1,750 for violating the order, the Times said, adding that the restaurant can appeal the permit suspension but must stay closed “until the hazard is abated.”

The paper said two other area In-N-Outs — in Pinole and San Ramon — have received notices of violating the vaccination order, the paper said.

San Francisco Bay Area public health officials have enacted some of the strictest COVID-19 rules in California, the Times added.

What did In-N-Out have to say?

“It is unreasonable, invasive and unsafe to force our restaurant associates to segregate customers into those who may be served and those who may not, whether based on the documentation they carry or any other reason,” Arnie Wensinger, In-N-Out’s chief legal and business officer, said in response to the Pleasant Hill shutdown, according to the paper. “This is clear governmental overreach and is intrusive, improper, and offensive.”

IN-AND-OUT Dispute: Pleasant Hill In-N-Out Burger Shut Down for Repeatedly Defying COVID Health Orde

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Texas man beat to death 2-year-old girl after she put her shoes on the wrong feet ahead of birthday celebrations

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A Texas man was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole after he beat to death his girlfriend’s 2-year-old daughter after she failed to put her shoes on the correct feet.

The incident that resulted in the child’s death took place just moments before they were headed to a local store to pick up supplies for her upcoming birthday party.

What are the details?

A Bell County, Texas, judge sentenced 27-year-old Jadin Nunez to life in prison last week after a jury of his peers found him guilty of murdering 2-year-old Shannah McAlpine in 2019.

The incident unfolded in Sept. 2019 when the child reportedly put her shoes on the wrong feet, apparently enraging Nunez in the process.

Nunez, according to police, began beating Shannah, striking her across the face and then forcefully punching her in the stomach at least three times while he held her in the air.

Shannah’s mother, Ashley Marie McAlpine, then reportedly discovered the child in distress and said that she whisked her from the room and placed her on a bed elsewhere in the home. Nunez, she said, then came into the room and reportedly began choking the child with both hands. McApline said that the child began to turn blue, but Nunez refused to give up. When he did stop choking her, the child gasped for breath and curled into a fetal position, she recalled.

Later on that night, McAlpine said that she awakened to hear her daughter crying and tried to ply her with food and drink before realizing that the child’s stomach was swollen and hot, but the rest of her body was cold.

McAlpine said that she tried to put her daughter in the shower, but the child was unable to stand and could not breathe.

She soon phoned 911 and summoned first responders to the home.

When authorities arrived at the scene, they discovered the child unresponsive and covered in bruises.

Authorities determined that the child — who was just days away from her third birthday — died of blunt force trauma to her stomach and arrested Nunez two days after the child’s death.

McAlpine faces charges of injury to a child after authorities said she allegedly failed to stop Nunez from beating her child. According to the Killeen Daily Herald, McApline is being held in the Bell County Jail in lieu of a $500,000 bond on the first-degree felony charge.

A child protective service report alleged that McAlpine was aware that Nunez was beating her children but did nothing to stop it.

McAlpine has pleaded not guilty and is due in court on Friday.

Temple man arrested in connection with death of two-year-old 5:30 pm

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Ex-Clinton aide Huma Abedin claims a US senator sexually assaulted her in new book

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Longtime Hillary Clinton aide and estranged wife of former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner (N.Y.) Huma Abedin alleged in a new book that she was sexually assaulted by an unnamed U.S. senator in the mid-2000s.

What are the details?

In her forthcoming memoir, “Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds,” set for release next week, Abedin recounts certain details about the incident but gives away few clues about the senator’s party or other aspects of his identity, the Guardian reported.

The incident allegedly took place sometime between 2001 and 2009, when Abedin worked for then-U.S. Senator from New York Hillary Clinton, before Clinton became the secretary of state and the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee.

Abedin writes that she was at a Washington, D.C., dinner attended by “a few senators and their aides” — though not Clinton — when she “ended up walking out with one of the senators, and soon we stopped in front of his building and he invited me in for coffee. Once inside, he told me to make myself comfortable on the couch.”

Here’s more from the Guardian:

She says the senator took off his blazer, rolled up his sleeves and made coffee while they continued to talk.

“Then, in an instant, it all changed. He plopped down to my right, put his left arm around my shoulder, and kissed me, pushing his tongue into my mouth, pressing me back on the sofa.

“I was so utterly shocked, I pushed him away. All I wanted was for the last 10 seconds to be erased.”

Abedin writes that the senator seemed surprised but apologized and said he had “misread” her “all this time”. As she considered how to leave “without this ending badly”, she writes, the senator asked if she wanted to stay.

“Then I said something only the twentysomething version of me would have come up with – ‘I am so sorry’ – and walked out, trying to appear as nonchalant as possible.”

The former Clinton aide recalled that she kept away from the senator for a number of days before eventually running into him on Capitol Hill, where the two had an awkward exchange resulting in an agreement to remain friends.

What else?

In her memoir, Abedin writes that she soon “buried the incident” and succeeded in erasing it from her memory “entirely” until 2018, when the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh brought the assault back to mind.

She reportedly alleges that her remembrance of the experience was triggered after reading about Christine Blasey Ford “being accused of ‘conveniently’ remembering” Kavanaugh’s alleged assault against her.

Judge in Kyle Rittenhouse case rules that men he fatally shot and wounded can’t be called ‘victims’ — but defense can call them ‘rioters’ and ‘looters’

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The judge presiding over the Kyle Rittenhouse homicide trial ruled Monday that the prosecution can’t refer two men he fatally shot — and another man he wounded — as “victims,” the
Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

What’s more, the paper said, Kenosha County Circuit Judge Bruce Schroeder added that Rittenhouse’s attorneys can refer to the three shot men as “rioters” and “looters.”

What are the details?

The decision on courtroom semantics stems from Schroeder’s “standard rule,” the Journal-Sentinel said, as he prohibits use of the term “victim” until someone is convicted of a crime, which hasn’t happened yet.

Rittenhouse, 18, was charged with homicide and attempted homicide after he fatally shot Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber and wounded Gaige Grosskreutz in Kenosha, Wisconsin,
NBC News said.

Rittenhouse — who was 17 on the night of the Aug. 25, 2020, shootings — is from Illinois and was in Kenosha to defend businesses from looting and arson amid rioting over the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man, by a white police officer. Rittenhouse pleaded not guilty to the charges against him and said he acted in self-defense.

“I feel I had to protect myself,” Rittenhouse
said last fall during an interview from a juvenile detention center. “I would have died that night if I didn’t.”

Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger wanted Rittenhouse’s lawyers barred from calling the Rosenbaum, Huber, and Grosskreutz “looters, rioters, arsonists or any other pejorative term,” the Journal-Sentinel said.

More from the paper:

While looting, rioting and arson occurred in the two nights before the shooting, Binger argued that unless there’s specific proof Rosenbaum, Huber and Grosskreutz were engaged in any of those actions, and that Rittenhouse had seen it, the labels are even more “loaded” than what judge ascribes to “victim.”

Schroeder was not swayed. “Let the evidence show what it shows,” he said, and declined to prohibit the defense from using the state’s unwanted terms.

Not surprisingly, CNN talking heads were decidedly unhappy with the judge’s ruling:

Judge says men Kyle Rittenhouse killed shouldn’t be called ‘victims’

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What the left will likely ignore

As
TheBlaze reported last year, video recorded on the night of the shootings allegedly caught Rosenbaum antagonizing a gun-carrying group in town to defend property, glaring at them, and daring them to “shoot me!”

Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @Julio_Rosas11

He even uttered the N-word as black people were feet away. (Content warning: Language, racial slurs):

In addition,
video allegedly shows Rosenbaum — who apparently removed his red T-shirt to use as a head covering — chasing after a male armed with a rifle. Rosenbaum then allegedly throws a bag of tools at the guy with the gun and then lunges at him, after which the individual with the gun opens fire.

Rosenbaum was then seen in a
graphic clip of the shooting aftermath dying in the street and wearing the same capri-length jeans, white sneakers with white socks, and tan belt as he’s wearing in the video of him confronting militia members.

Anything else?

NBC News reported that Grosskreutz — who has not been charged with a crime — sued the city, the county, and law enforcement this month for enabling a “band of white nationalist vigilantes” amid unrest following Blake’s shooting.

While a spokesperson representing Kenosha and its police department declined to comment, the network said that an attorney representing Kenosha County and the sheriff called Grosskreutz’s allegations false.

“The lawsuit also fails to acknowledge that Mr. Grosskreutz was himself armed with a firearm when he was shot, and Mr. Grosskreutz failed to file the lawsuit against the person who actually shot him,” attorney Sam Hall said, according to NBC News.

Indeed,
Grosskreutz allegedly told a friend that he regretted “not killing the kid” who shot him at close range — and tore off a chunk of his arm — and “emptying the entire mag.”

Here’s a clip showing both Huber and Grosskreutz getting shot shortly after Rosenbaum was shot. (Content warning: Language):

Judge in Kyle Rittenhouse case rules that men he fatally shot and wounded can’t be called ‘victims’ — but defense can call them ‘rioters’ and ‘looters’

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The judge presiding over the Kyle Rittenhouse homicide trial ruled Monday that the prosecution can’t refer two men he fatally shot — and another man he wounded — as “victims,” the
Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

What’s more, the paper said, Kenosha County Circuit Judge Bruce Schroeder added that Rittenhouse’s attorneys can refer to the three shot men as “rioters” and “looters.”

What are the details?

The decision on courtroom semantics stems from Schroeder’s “standard rule,” the Journal-Sentinel said, as he prohibits use of the term “victim” until someone is convicted of a crime, which hasn’t happened yet.

Rittenhouse, 18, was charged with homicide and attempted homicide after he fatally shot Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber and wounded Gaige Grosskreutz in Kenosha, Wisconsin,
NBC News said.

Rittenhouse — who was 17 on the night of the Aug. 25, 2020, shootings — is from Illinois and was in Kenosha to defend businesses from looting and arson amid rioting over the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man, by a white police officer. Rittenhouse pleaded not guilty to the charges against him and said he acted in self-defense.

“I feel I had to protect myself,” Rittenhouse
said last fall during an interview from a juvenile detention center. “I would have died that night if I didn’t.”

Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger wanted Rittenhouse’s lawyers barred from calling the Rosenbaum, Huber, and Grosskreutz “looters, rioters, arsonists or any other pejorative term,” the Journal-Sentinel said.

More from the paper:

While looting, rioting and arson occurred in the two nights before the shooting, Binger argued that unless there’s specific proof Rosenbaum, Huber and Grosskreutz were engaged in any of those actions, and that Rittenhouse had seen it, the labels are even more “loaded” than what judge ascribes to “victim.”

Schroeder was not swayed. “Let the evidence show what it shows,” he said, and declined to prohibit the defense from using the state’s unwanted terms.

Not surprisingly, CNN talking heads were decidedly unhappy with the judge’s ruling:

Judge says men Kyle Rittenhouse killed shouldn’t be called ‘victims’

youtu.be

What the left will likely ignore

As
TheBlaze reported last year, video recorded on the night of the shootings allegedly caught Rosenbaum antagonizing a gun-carrying group in town to defend property, glaring at them, and daring them to “shoot me!”

Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @Julio_Rosas11

He even uttered the N-word as black people were feet away. (Content warning: Language, racial slurs):

In addition,
video allegedly shows Rosenbaum — who apparently removed his red T-shirt to use as a head covering — chasing after a male armed with a rifle. Rosenbaum then allegedly throws a bag of tools at the guy with the gun and then lunges at him, after which the individual with the gun opens fire.

Rosenbaum was then seen in a
graphic clip of the shooting aftermath dying in the street and wearing the same capri-length jeans, white sneakers with white socks, and tan belt as he’s wearing in the video of him confronting militia members.

Anything else?

NBC News reported that Grosskreutz — who has not been charged with a crime — sued the city, the county, and law enforcement this month for enabling a “band of white nationalist vigilantes” amid unrest following Blake’s shooting.

While a spokesperson representing Kenosha and its police department declined to comment, the network said that an attorney representing Kenosha County and the sheriff called Grosskreutz’s allegations false.

“The lawsuit also fails to acknowledge that Mr. Grosskreutz was himself armed with a firearm when he was shot, and Mr. Grosskreutz failed to file the lawsuit against the person who actually shot him,” attorney Sam Hall said, according to NBC News.

Indeed,
Grosskreutz allegedly told a friend that he regretted “not killing the kid” who shot him at close range — and tore off a chunk of his arm — and “emptying the entire mag.”

Here’s a clip showing both Huber and Grosskreutz getting shot shortly after Rosenbaum was shot. (Content warning: Language):

Doctor on FDA panel says only way to learn about COVID vaccine effects in children is to ‘start giving it’

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Dr. Eric Rubin, who sits on the Food and Drug Administration independent advisory panel, justified recommending the Pfizer COVID vaccine for young children Tuesday by deferring to potential upsides despite unknown side effects.

What is the background?

Nearly one year after the government approved the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines for adults, an FDA advisory panel recommended — by a vote of 17-0, with one abstention — granting emergency authorization of the Pfizer vaccine for children ages 5 to 11.

As the Washington Post noted, the advisory board’s advice is nonbinding. However, the FDA is certain to grant emergency authorization.

Next, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will have to authorize vaccinating children. Once CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky gives approval, which may come as soon as next week, young children can begin receiving the Pfizer vaccine.

Child recipients will receive one-third the dose given to adults.

What did Dr. Rubin say?

Before the vote, panel members presented their opinions and concerns about giving the COVID vaccine to children.

Despite the unknown, Rubin — a physician at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and immunology professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health — said the vaccine should be approved for children. Many other experts on the panel voiced similar opinions.

“The data show that the vaccine works and is pretty safe … and yet we’re worried about a side effect that we can’t measure yet, but it’s probably real,” Rubin said.

“What sways me here is that it’s a very, sort of, personal choice. If I had a child who was a transplant recipient, I would really want to be able to use a vaccine like this. And there are certainly kids who probably should be vaccinated,” he explained. “The question of how broadly we use it, though, I think is a substantial one. I know it’s not our question … but I do think that it’s a relatively close call.”

In fact, according to Rubin, the vaccine should be approved in spite of the unknown, for administering the vaccine is the only way possible to learn of potential side effects.

“It really is going to be a question of what the prevailing conditions are,” Rubin said. “But we’re never going to learn about how safe this vaccine is unless we start giving it. That’s just the way it goes.”

“That’s how we found out about rare complications of other vaccines,” he added. “And I do think that we should vote to approve it.”

FDA votes on approval of the Pfizer vaccine for children aged 5-11 | USA Today

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Interestingly, the panel member who abstained from voting — Michael Kurilla, an infectious diseases expert at the National Institutes of Health — said kids who have contracted COVID-19 in the past may not need the vaccine.

“There are high-risk individuals, and I think they do need to be attended to. We do need to provide a vaccine for them,” Kurilla said. “But for many others, one dose or no dose, even. If they’ve had prior COVID infection, they may not need anything more.”

ISIS-K in Afghanistan could be capable of launching terror attack against US in just 6 months, defense official says

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ISIS-K terrorists in Afghanistan could have the capability to conduct external attacks on other countries — including the United States — in as little as six to 12 months, a Pentagon official told members of Congress this week.

What are the details?

While testifying in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Colin Kahl warned that the terrorist group has every intention of conducting such attacks but currently lacks the capability. The same is reportedly true of al Qaeda.

But Kahl said that could be changing in relatively short order, according to the Military Times.

“We could see ISIS-K generate that capability somewhere between 6 to 12 months, according to current assessments by the intelligence community. For al Qaida, it would take a year or two to reconstitute that capability,” Kahl said during the testimony.

“We have to remain vigilant against that possibility,” he added.

CBS News reported that the timeline greatly differs from the one offered by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley in September. At the time, Milley said that ISIS-K or al Qaeda would need six to 36 months to rebuild — and his timeline referred to only reconstitution, not the time it would take to generate capabilities to attack the U.S.

What else?

ISIS-K is the terrorist group responsible for killing 13 U.S. service members in a bombing outsid e the Kabul airport in Afghanistan in August.

In October, reports surfaced that the terrorist who carried out the attack was one of thousands of prisoners freed from Bagram Air Base in early August when the Taliban seized control of the facility.

The news only further increased criticism against the Biden administration over its bungled withdrawal process from the country, which resulted in tens of thousands of U.S. citizens and Afghan nationals scrambling to exit the country as the Taliban swept through. Many were left stranded.

Anything else?

Testifying alongside Kahl, Lt. Gen. James J. Mingus, joint staff director for operations, was careful to note that the short timeline is only if the U.S. and allies don’t intervene.

Kahl, too, seemed to walk back some of the urgency of his report even while warning that “the terrorist threat continues” in the region. He noted that intelligence officials report that the risk to the American homeland “is at its lowest point since Sept. 11, 2001.”

Conservative lawmakers reportedly bristled at the comment.

“It doesn’t sound like a low risk when you have just told us that the possibility of an attack from ISIS-K on our homeland could come six to 12 months from now,” Republican Sen. Joni Ernst (Iowa) said.

CDC says immunocompromised Americans can now get a 4th COVID shot

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Immunocompromised Americans who have had a third COVID-19 shot can now get a fourth shot, according to newly updated
guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What are the details?

Affected Americans are now eligible for a fourth coronavirus vaccine, according to a report from
Insider.

The CDC’s new guidance states that Americans can get a fourth dose of any FDA-approved coronavirus shots six months after receiving their third shot.

The guidance states, “Moderately and severely immunocompromised people aged >=18 years who completed an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine primary series and received an additional mRNA vaccine dose may receive a single COVID-19 booster dose (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna or Janssen) at least 6 months after completing their third mRNA vaccine dose. In such situations, people who are moderately and severely immunocompromised may receive a total of four COVID-19 vaccine doses.”

The CDC authorized a third dose for certain immunocompromised people ages 18 years and older in August.

What else?

Approximately 3% of the U.S. population is considered to be either moderately or severely immunosuppressed and at a heightened risk of COVID-19-related illnesses and death, Insider reported.

According to a Tuesday report from CNN, “A study from Johns Hopkins University this summer showed that vaccinated immunocompromised people were 485 times more likely to end up in the hospital or die from COVID-19 compared to most vaccinated people. In small studies, the CDC said, fully vaccinated immunocompromised people accounted for about 44% of the breakthrough cases that required hospitalization. People who are immunocompromised are also more likely to transmit the virus to people who had close contact with them.”

Last week, Dr. Charles Bregier, medical director of Novant Health Employee Occupational Health and Corporate Health, said that some of the population might need the fourth shot.

“It’s even recommended for some people who are significantly immunocompromised that they go and get a fourth dose of vaccine 30 days after the third dose if they’re thought to be significantly immunocompromised or have their blood checked and find out they have zero or low antibody levels,” Bregier said at the time.